2016 Political Ties Award

We are excited and honored to learn that our paper, “Kantian fractionalization predicts the conflict propensity of the international system,” coauthored with Skyler Cranmer and Elizabeth Menninga and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has just been selected for this year’s Political Ties Award, given annually by the Political Networks Section of the American Political Science Association for the best article published on political networks the prior year. We are grateful to the section officers and selection committee for recognizing our contribution.

More about this paper is available here and here.

Math + Political Science collaboration questions ‘Democratic Peace’ theory

KantianCommunitiesUsing a new technique to analyze 52 years of international conflict, an interdisciplinary collaborative team between Political Science and Mathematics suggests that there may be no such thing as a “democratic peace.” The study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, co-authored by Ohio State Political Science professor Skyler Cranmer, University of Iowa Political Science professor Elizabeth Menninga (who recently earned her Political Science Ph.D. from UNC–Chapel Hill), and Peter Mucha from Carolina Mathematics.

Read more here…

Identifying virulence strategists in uropathogenic E.coli

UPECsiderophoresOur first paper from our collaboration with the Henderson Lab in Infectious Diseases at Washington University in St.Louis recently appeared in ACS Infectious Diseases. In this work, we applied tools of community detection in networks and data biclustering to identify virulence gene patterns in a population of UTI-causing clinical E.coli isolates. Using these methods, we showed that siderophore genes appear in virulence “strategists” groups and that these groups correspond with variations in antibiotic resistance and patient sex.

This collaboration has been both personally and professionally rewarding for me. Professionally, it is exciting to see our data analysis methods translated closer to clinical relevance, and we will continue to push this direction to make it even more so. Personally, it’s been a lot of fun to write a paper with an old friend: Jeff and I first met probably in 1987 (I think) but this is our first joint publication together. I just have to guess that this nearly 28 years is going to be my lifetime personal record for time to first publication (conditional of course on there being a publication—spoken like a mathematician).

With congratulations to all involved, we look forward to continued output from this interdisciplinary collaboration!

Mucha and Henderson present at OSSD 2014

OSSD2014Mucha presents today at the annual meeting of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences in a joint presentation with Jeffrey P. Henderson of Washington University. The presentation, titled “Virulence Network Detection in a Mixed Male and Female Urinary Tract Infection Population,” describes recent work using biclustering of data and community detection of network representations to uncover clusters within this patient group.

The manuscript detailing this work is currently in preparation. When it is finally submitted this summer, it will only have been 27 years since Mucha and Henderson first met before they finally coauthored a paper together. You never know who you might end up working with…